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Comments for Digitizing "Chinese Englishmen" http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org Representations of race and empire in the nineteenth century Wed, 19 Sep 2012 01:26:01 -0400 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.5 Comment on Straits Chinese Magazine by Askay Chang http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/straits-chinese-magazine/#comment-6402 Wed, 19 Sep 2012 01:26:01 +0000 http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/?page_id=18#comment-6402 Thank you for digitizing parts of the Magazine. Just some small comments:

regarding this Profile Image which is not representative of the topic. The image is of a 17th century Chinese Jesuit who is most known for his work in France. Apart from the few such as Sir Song Ong Siang and Lim Boon Heng, many of the Straits Chinese of early 19th century did not enjoy the luxury of long distance travel.

The baba society was hideously unequal… men enjoyed colonial privileges while, in general, their women were kept in the dark ages. The two stalwart Straits Chinese I mentioned earlier, Song and Lim, were conscious of, and became champions of a more just Straits Chinese Society.

The following links are pictures of life as it was led by the wealthy few

http://eastindiesmuseum.com/straits_chinese/old_photo_straitschinese1.jpg

http://exhibitions.nlb.gov.sg/limboonkeng/EN/images/pic/SE05_37.jpg
{L-R) Lim and Song

http://www.cmariec.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/nonya_couple.jpg

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Comment on About by Jessica Langer http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/#comment-17 Wed, 07 Mar 2012 03:30:12 +0000 http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/?page_id=2#comment-17 This is an incredibly important addition to our knowledge base around the effects of colonialism on culture and on knowledge transfer. I know I’ve learned a lot from reading the archived scans from Straits Chinese Magazine, and I imagine that most visitors will feel similarly.

Although there are of course issues around access to online media (cf Michelle Moravec), I think that digitizing this resource and making it freely available – not to mention using an SEO-friendly CMS to build the surrounding site, and promoting the work via social media channels – is the best way to disseminate it effectively. Which is of course a major purpose of a project like this!

Please keep it up!

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Comment on About by Saul Fimbrez http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/#comment-16 Tue, 06 Mar 2012 17:02:46 +0000 http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/?page_id=2#comment-16 I really like your writing style, wonderful information, thankyou for putting up : D.

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Comment on ‘Chinese Athleticism’ by Addressing Archival Silence on 19th Century Colonialism – Part 1: The Power of the Archive | Adeline Koh http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/2012/02/27/chinese-athleticism/#comment-15 Sun, 04 Mar 2012 15:11:15 +0000 http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/?p=127#comment-15 […] rely on British notions of sports and manliness to establish credibility; in a news story on ‘Chinese Athleticism,’ (Vol 1. Pg 29), for example, the editors urge the colonial government to grant them a piece of […]

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Comment on A Victim of ‘Chap-Ji-Ki’ by Addressing Archival Silence on 19th Century Colonialism – Part 1: The Power of the Archive | Adeline Koh http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/2012/02/27/a-victim-of-chap-ji-ki/#comment-14 Sun, 04 Mar 2012 15:10:34 +0000 http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/?p=146#comment-14 […] short story, ‘A Victim of Chap-Ji-Ki’ by Lew See Fah (Vol. 2, no #6, pg 70), is a morality tale of how gambling (chap-ji-ki) can lead to insanity and […]

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Comment on Straits Chinese Magazine by Addressing Archival Silence on 19th Century Colonialism – Part 1: The Power of the Archive | Adeline Koh http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/straits-chinese-magazine/#comment-13 Sun, 04 Mar 2012 15:09:32 +0000 http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/?page_id=18#comment-13 […] ‘Chinese Englishmen’  focuses on how this group of intermediaries negotiated these tensions in The Straits Chinese Magazine, a journal that appeared in Singapore from the late nineteenth century and which contained a […]

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Comment on About by Dr Ian Welch http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/#comment-12 Sat, 03 Mar 2012 03:42:48 +0000 http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/?page_id=2#comment-12 Professor Mead asks if Macaulayist thinking was prominent in SE Asia. I can’t comment directly but I think the Chinese are in a different category to the British-Indian desire to create an Anglophone Civil service class.

If I can parallel the Anglophone situation in China itself, the rush was from Chinese anxious to learn English, primarily for commercial reasons. It is essential to keep in mind the enormous Chinese commercial links with SE Asia over many centuries. When the Brits took over the key trading ports of Malaya the need for Anglophone Chinese grew significantly. The great Australian example was Lowe Kong Meng, a leading Melbourne merchant (brought bananas among other things) who spoke perfect English and excellent French—his family were major traders with Mauritius.

The first Anglo-Chinese College (Malaya) was intended to produce indigenous clergy/catechists for the London Missionary Society. It moved to Hong Kong and closed in the 1860s without producing a single ordained minister, although it did send a number of Chinese missionaries to the goldfields of California and Australia, but even then, some of the blokes preferred interpreting jobs rather than evangelistic work. Much the same story applied to St. Paul’s Anglican College in HK.

St John’s (Episcopal) University in Shanghai reflected earlier decisions by the American Episcopalians to teach their original boys’ and girls’ schools only in English. By the turn of the 20C, the only Chinese instruction in St. John’s was in divinity, a tiny part of an enrolment that was otherwise overwhelmingly focussed on non-religious work.

Of course, many Chinese Anglophones did find work with the Chinese Government. I think Frank DiKotter’s book amply deals with the status of English in the period between 1911 and 1952.

My own experience of English-speaking capabilities in China is one of total admiration and profound sorrow for the state of Asian languages and cultures in Australia, but then our motivations have yet to come to terms with the “Asian Century.”

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Comment on About by Philip Mead http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/#comment-10 Fri, 02 Mar 2012 16:16:57 +0000 http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/?page_id=2#comment-10 This is an intriguing subject that, to my knowledge, has been little explored. It would make a fascinating book and I dearly hope one will be forthcoming from the project at some future date. I have read extensively on the subject of the British Raj’s conscious efforts to nurture a (British) educated class of Indians who would cement British rule in 19th century India, but have found little by way of literature on Britain’s attempt to create an Anglo-oriented Straits Chinese elite. Dr. Welch is right in noting that T.B. Macaulay was instrumental in initiating the policy process for India – principally using the English language as a vehicle of imperial rule. One just wonders if such an official imperium policy operated in South East Asia. I look forward to following the project with great interest. And please, consider publishing a book at some point!

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Comment on Straits Chinese Magazine by Roger Whitson http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/straits-chinese-magazine/#comment-8 Thu, 01 Mar 2012 20:25:30 +0000 http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/?page_id=18#comment-8 Another potential group could be the Anvil Academic Publishing group sponsored by NITLE and CLIR: http://www.nitle.org/live/news/195-clir-and-nitle-to-launch-digital-academic

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Comment on Decolonizing the Archive by Roger Whitson http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/decolonizing-the-archive/#comment-7 Thu, 01 Mar 2012 20:20:51 +0000 http://chineseenglishmen.adelinekoh.org/?page_id=16#comment-7 I agree with Katherine. This looks like a fascinating project. Are you looking to include TEI markup for the issues of the magazine? This would allow tons of potential stuff, like text-mining the entire corpus to determine how people are addressed in the magazine or what kinds of articles are written about them. I also wonder if (re: the idea of alternate maps of Englishness) you could create a GIS project tracking where these people lived, etc.

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